Guess What Folks, David S. Evans Does Not Know His Ass from a Hole in the Ground (Patrick Byrne’s reply to David Evans’ Bitcoin hit-piece, “Guess What Folks, Overstock.com Does Not Take Bitcoin”)

Guess What Folks, David S. Evans Does Not Know His Ass from a Hole in the Ground (Patrick Byrne’s reply to David Evans’ Bitcoin hit-piece, “Guess What Folks, Overstock.com Does Not Take Bitcoin”)

On May 23, 2014 PMNTS.com (“what’s next in payments and commerce”) published a piece (“Guess What Folks, Overstock.com Does Not Take Bitcoin”) by David S. Evans that is as remarkably poor an example of research and analysis as one is likely to see these days.

  • “Partick Bryne, Overstock’s CEO and ‘Bitcoin Messiah’, even gave the keynote at last week’s Bitcoin2014 conference in Amsterdam. If he’s not a believer, who is?” asks Mr. Evans in his opening paragraph (misspelling both my first name and last in a foreshadowing of the general shoddiness of his homework).
  • In the next paragraph Evans falsely asserts about Overstock’s acceptance of Bitcoin, “To pay with the Bitcoin button you need a Coinbase wallet.” In this he is simply wrong: Anyone with Bitcoin can pay with that button (I suspect that this mistake is another expression of Evans’ unfamiliarity with Bitcoin and inattention to detail).
  • Now jumping to the end (where Mr. Evans buries his lead), “In the end, in this bizarro world, even the Bitcoin Messiah wants greenbacks.” Actually, even the Bitcoin Messiah has to pay his suppliers, and since they want greenbacks, at some point the Bitcoins that customers spend at Overstock must be converted to greenbacks to pay for those goods and services. This basic truth has Mr. Evans so agitated that he sees the whole process as “smoke and mirrors.”
  • In developing the previous point, Evans falsely asserts, “Overstock.com never takes possession of bitcoins or anything denominated in bitcoins.” This is also wrong: at checkout our customers’ Bitcoins are moved to our wallet, then Coinbase sells Bitcoins from that wallet back into the market in return for dollars on our behalf (however, we have stated publicly and accurately that we are accumulating Bitcoin reserves equal to 10% of all Bitcoin spent on our site).
  • Another paragraph, another blithering idiocy: “It gets weirder. How did you get bitcoins in your wallet in the first place? You were asked to link your bank account to Coinbase.” Actually, there are a plethora of ways one may acquire Bitcoin that have nothing to do with Coinbase, and all of the Bitcoin thus acquired works with Overstock.
  •  “Overstock could have a bitcoin account, and pay people and vendors in bitcoin, regardless of whether people want to buy stuff from Overstock using their bitcoins.” Except that nobody (e.g., the IRS) has worked out the tax issues related to paying employees in Bitcoin (though I have on several occasions said publicly that we wish to be at the forefront of paying Bitcoin to employees and vendors who will accept it, and have publicly invited firms that work in those areas to contact me).

And so on and so forth.  Nearly every paragraph of David Evans’ initial piece, and even in his back-spinning “clarification,” has errors that would make a college sophomore blush. That is quite an accomplishment for a man who bills himself as “ranked among the top 3 percent of economists in the world” (with, as one comes to expect from Mr. Evans, no explanation or citation).

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Patrick Byrne’s Bitcoin 2014 Keynote Address: 500 Years of Liberalism from the Netherlands to Cryptocurrency

Patrick Byrne’s Bitcoin 2014 Keynote Address: 500 Years of Liberalism from the Netherlands to Cryptocurrency

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Joe Floren Screws the Pooch (Goldman Sachs, Morgan Lewis & Bockius)

Joe Floren Screws the Pooch (Goldman Sachs, Morgan Lewis & Bockius)

Note: This was written and originally published in May of 2012. I republish it now for no good reason other than a recrudescence of disgust.

The first time I heard Joe Floren speak I was standing behind him in an elevator in his law firm’s San Francisco office tower  as another lawyer informed him that the subpoena Joe Floren had served the previous day on a colleague of mine had reached her in the hospital, after a difficult delivery of her first child, while she was breastfeeding for the first time.

Gleefully Joe Floren replied, “Really? That’s beautiful. I love it!”

Flor_70014

(Joe Floren with insecure little goatee)

Joseph E. Floren, Esq., is a lawyer at Morgan Lewis, the white shoe law firm defending Goldman Sachs against Overstock’s prime broker litigation, and tonight I celebrate the mistake Joe Floren made yesterday.  In filing Goldman’s response to Overstock’s motion to vacate the trial court judge’s decision to stay his own decision to unseal various documents related to this litigation (in more straightforward English: the trial court judge decided to unseal some documents while also deciding to delay acting on his decision, but we objected to this delay, and Goldman responded to our objections), Joe Floren screwed the pooch. He filed something containing an attachment he forgot to redact. That attachment is a previous filing of Overstock’s, a filing which contains but a sample of the shenanigans at Goldman and Merrill that has turned up over the course of five years and millions of pages of discovery, but which filing we had redacted when we made it (as good litigants do).

Fortunately for the cause of all that is good and right about America, Joe Floren’s goof came to the attention of a diligent 1st amendment attorney in California named Karl Olson, who represents the Economist, Bloomberg, the New York Times and Wenner Publications (owners of Rolling Stone magazine) in their efforts to obtain the documents.  Karl Olson provided Joe Floren’s sloppy filing to his clients. Tonight these stories appeared:

Rolling Stone: Accidentally Released – and Incredibly Embarrassing – Documents Show How Goldman et al Engaged in ‘Naked Short Selling’ 

 Bloomberg: Goldman, Merrill E-Mails Show Naked Shorting, Filing Says

Economist: An enlightening mistake 

Really, Joe Floren?  That’s beautiful.  I love it.

gmailretract-150x199

How Joe Floren looks to his colleagues, per Above the Law

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You Don’t Have to Be Einstein to Get This….. But Apparently He Did.

“The prestige of government has undoubtedly been lowered considerably by the Prohibition law. For nothing is more destructive of respect for the government and the law of the land than passing laws which cannot be enforced. It is an open secret that the dangerous increase of crime in this country is closely connected with this.”

— Albert Einstein
(1879-1955) Physicist and Professor, Nobel Prize 1921
Source: “My First Impression of the U.S.A.”, 1921
http://quotes.liberty-tree.ca/quote_blog/Albert.Einstein.Quote.9993

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Stevie Cohen, When PBS is Devoting Frontline Shows to Your Perfidy (“To Catch a Traitor”), Is That Bad? (SAC)

 

And yes, I know that PBS used “trader,” not “traitor.” De gustibus non est disputandum.

 

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Economic Warfare as an Instrument of Transnational Organized Crime

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Steven A. Cohen: “That’s guilty! Guilty, guilty, guilty!!”

 

NBC: Billionaire Steven Cohen’s hedge fund could pay $1B fine in fraud case: sources

 

 

 

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Jim Cramer’s TheStreet.com Upgrades OSTK to Buy: ‘The Hun is always either at your throat or at your feet’ – Winston Churchill

On May 31 TheStreet.com (which at one point had notorious Wall Street villains Jim Cramer and David Rocker as shareholders #1 and #2, and has repeatedly been used by Jim Cramer in the pursuit of the kinds of illegal market practices for which he so proudly took credit in this video), published an “upgrade”: Overstock.com Inc. Stock Upgraded (OSTK). Given my history with Jim Cramer, including unsuccessfully attempting to draw a libel suit from him some years ago by writing ““Jim Cramer is a Complicated Man and by calling Cramer a “criminal” in an Overstock.com marketing email to close to 20 million people , the compliment is something of a surprise, and reminiscent of the full Churchill line, “By its sudden collapse, … the proud German army has once again proved the truth of the saying, ‘The Hun is always either at your throat or at your feet.'”

Patrick

N.B. Generally I divorce references to my day job at Overstock from my writing on DeepCapture. I mention Overstock here only when it is unavoidable, as it is here. Nothing in this brief post is meant to suggest endorsement of Overstock or TheStreet.com (which I continue to maintain is one node in a criminal enterprise that has emerged on Wall Street in the last 15 years, abetted by an SEC which has bravely re-branded itself as Wall Street’s Towel Boy), nor make any comment about the stock price.

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Great Teachers & A Grand Unified Political Theory

Some months ago, while scraping the bottom of the barrel of possible speakers, the esteemed Rutgers Philosophy Department invited me to give a talk. Also invited to attend were the Economics and Law faculties and students. I decided to speak about some of my greatest teachers in life, and show how what I learned from them ties into various decisions I have made in business and in life. I hope you enjoy it, because I put my back into it.

Patrick M. Byrne speaks at Rutgers University from Overstock.com on Vimeo.

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Professor William Black Flunks Bethany McLean for Giving Hall Passes to Goldman Sachs and Wall Street

I first heard of William K. Black over 20 years ago as the regulator who had stood up to the “Keating 5″ and come out the hero of the S&L crisis (in which I gained some early experience: hence my awareness of him). Later, as a professor of law and economics at University of Missouri in 2005, Black wrote a book about control fraud,  “The Best Way to Rob a Bank is to Own One,” available here. You should read it.

Yet I had never heard Black speak until one night in April, 2009, when he appeared on Bill Moyers. How refreshing it was to see the tabloid analyses be at last replaced with discourse about the system itself (and remember that while the following claims now seem barely controversial, in 2009 most were still heretical):  Banksters. Fraud versus trust. Moral hazard and pathological incentives in the financial system (e.g., lending firms’ Ninja Loans + investment bankers pooling mortgages + captured ratings agencies = toxic waste = systemic risk).  FBI warned on mortgage fraud in 2004, but the Machine failed to react. Bank lobbyists. Glass Steagall. Brooksley Born and Credit Default Swaps. Bailout of the elites. Bank CEOs. Cover-up. Strategy to keep the public from understanding how bad the problem is. Prompt Corrective Action Law: Nationalize zombie banks. WHERE IS OUR PECORA COMMISSION? Scared of insolvent banks being revealed. Mimicking the strategies of Japan’s Lost Decade.  AIG-to-Goldman bailout.  Increasingly horrific give-aways of taxpayer money. Stop hiding the losses.  The current bleak numbers still vastly underestimate the fraud problem.

Black had me at “control fraud.”  I leave it to the community of readers to judge the familiarity of the other claims he made:

 

Alas, Bethany McLean and I are not so sympatico, and in fact have had a challenging relationship. Her side of the story is told  here:

Is Overstock the new Amazon?

PHANTOM MENACE

DeepCaptures’ side, here:

Bethany McLean: your benefit of the doubt is hereby revoked

Rocker Partners and Bethany McLean: the smarmiest guys in the room

David Einhorn, Cheryl Strauss, and the “Unavailable” Bethany McLean

One interesting aside: in the last year I have had numerous journalists bring up to me Bethany’s emails wherein she schemes with a hedge fund (emails obtained by DeepCapture from a New Jersey courthouse and published in Bethany McLean: your benefit of the doubt is hereby revoked). These journalists have told me that they know about it and see it as a tremendous breach of journalistic ethics. So there it sits, an open secret, although not, apparently, a secret anymore, but just something about which one whispers.  In a similar fashion, Jim Cramer’s video sat on DeepCapture for a couple of years drawing no comment, until Comedy Central confronted Cramer with it.

In any case, this week on CNBC Maria Bartiromo invited William Black and Bethany McLean on as guests to discuss the Justice Department’s decision not to pursue criminal charges against Goldman Sachs for its role in the financial crisis in general, and for selling financial products from whose specific failure Goldman profited. Truly remarkable performances were delivered by all, albeit in different ways.

Black responds to Maria’s opening by stating the obvious: Generating liar loans and packaging them for resale is fraud. There is no evidence that there was a significant federal investigation, or that a grand jury was convened. There is an absence of  accountability.  Goldman has been given a pass by Obama and Bush.

Bethany responds with bromides delivered with a dulcet confidence intended to suggest that she knows what she is talking about. Her analysis: I don’t think anybody is giving  Goldman Sachs a pass to be honest. I think this is a tough case to make. I do think integrity needs to be restored to the financial system, but you don’t do that by bringing a case that shouldn’t be made. Goldman Sachs didn’t make liars’ loans –  they actually among the Wall Street firms were not on the ground making mortgages. So if you can’t bring a case against Countrywide how can you possibly bring a case against Goldman Sachs?  … From an overall perspective Goldman Sachs as a firm lost money in the mortgage business. Awfully tough to bring that case to a jury and win, I think… I’m not giving Goldman a pass or any of Wall Street a pass. I think I’m with Bill on that. But I don’t think this was a criminal case.  I think Goldman’s customers should make the call: Do we want to do business with this firm? …

These vapid apologetics draw Maria Bartiromo’s stammering, nodding approval: As you said earlier, stupidity does not mean criminality.

Bethany: Greed and venality do not make a criminal case.

There are two remarkable items about Bethany’s performance. First, note the air of confidence she exudes when in fact (as will become clear) she has essentially no idea of what she is talking about (hence the expression “a journalistic understanding”). Second, note that Bethany is apparently unaware that the man she is debating on-air, Professor William K. Black, knows a lot about what she is talking about. In fact, he is perhaps the nation’s foremost expert on precisely the issue she and Maria are trying to spin to Goldman’s behalf: the federal prosecution of white collar crime at financial institutions.

Professor Black continues like a gentle professor with two weak students: Critical area here…. First, I’m the type of person that was involved in training the FBI agents, the assistant US attorneys, serving as the expert witness in these successful prosecutions where we had a 90% successful rate. Um, clearly people are not understanding fraud mechanisms. In accounting control fraud, the firm – loses – money. Indeed that is one of the defining elements because the way you maximize it is by making bad loans. And Goldman did make liar’s loans, it did it through subsidiaries, and Goldman purchased loans that it knew to be fraudulent, and it packaged them and sold them as if they were good loans. This belief that this is the first virgin crisis in which fraud was not driving it is amazing. Nobody believes it about the savings and loan debacle. No one believes it about the Enron era fraud. And given what you’ve seen in the last three weeks, how can you believe it out of the current…”

Bethany appears to panic slightly then, unable to respond substantively to a single one of Black’s arguments, simply locks into a repetitive, droning regurgitation of the talking points she just delivered a moment earlier (which amplifies my suspicion that some Goldman PR flack gave them to her to memorize). Behold Bethany McLean’s verbatim analysis of legal culpability in the greatest financial collapse of our lifetime (so far):

Maria, I think there was a hue and a cry and a lot of political pressure to bring charges in this case. And I think that if they could have, they would have. And I don’t think that any of our interests are served… I think it’s just as dangerous to bring a case that shouldn’t be made as to not bring a case that should be made. Neither one helps with the integrity of the financial system. I agree – peoples’ behavior during this crisis was unethical, it was abhorrent, it was every word you can come up with for ‘wrong.’ But if you are going to bring a case against Goldman Sachs you have to bring a case against every single other Wall Street firm as well as every mortgage originator as well as every home owner who lied on his or her mortgage application. You cannot single out one firm and say we are going to charge Goldman and we’re not bringing charges against everybody else. That’s wrong.

Maria Bartiromo: That’s a great point.

William Black (like a professor exasperated with dull students he can no longer humor): No, it’s not a great point. It’s a terrible point. You’ve got to start with somebody. Your first prosecution is always your first prosecution. And you can always say where there’s been an epidemic of fraud…”

Bethany’s nails-on-a-chalkboard apologetics have received a fair bit of shocked attention this week:

Columbia Journalism Review: “Bill Black goes on CNBC and shreds Maria Bartiromo and Bethany McLean on whether Goldman Sachs (and others) could and should have been prosecuted for fraud related to the financial crisis…”

Bill Black vs Goldman Sachs Apologists

WATCH: Bill Black On CNBC Debates Wall Street Fraud-Deniers Maria Bartiromo, Bethany McLean

Bethany McLean Demonstrates her Profound Lack of Understanding of Control Fraud, Gresham’s Dynamics, and Justice: “In this painful CNBC segment, former Goldman Sachs employee Bethany McLean provides a heartfelt apologia for her much-maligned former employer. Bethany says it is time for us all to move on for the good of confidence in the economy…In the process of prostrating herself for GS, she demonstrates her complete lack of understanding of control fraud, Gresham’s Dynamics, and how white collar crime can be pursued.”

I think this interview was unusual in that her panic drew Bethany into baring her biases incautiously (though frankly, the first sentence she uttered the first time she called me in 2004 conveyed to me that she is a shill and a Mean Girl). Asserting without argument that  political pressure supported bringing charges against Goldman, Bethany appears literally incapable of considering the possibility that net political pressure ran in the opposite direction, and that in fact were it not for “political pressure” Goldman Sachs would have been prosecuted years ago.

But personally, I think Bethany is not really incapable of considering such a possibility, and that her adamancy thus has other motive.

Daily headlines disappoint with lack of prosecution, making clear that this will go down as history’s “first virgin financial crisis” (in Professor Black’s phrase) in which fraud played no role.  When you read these headlines, imagine Bethany McLean, or someone very much like her, standing in an oak-paneled room in Washington, DC, droning through the same set of talking points to some senior decision-maker, and that decision-maker slowly getting snowed in under the same dulcet non sequiturs as appear in this remarkable exchange.

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